June 23, 2020

With magnet

Struggling even with the simplest of concepts


I really understand clouds; their different shape, sizes, and their immensity. 


However, at one point I struggled to understand why they turn pink during sunsets. Even now, I am not really sure I can explain why clouds are a purplish blue color at sunrise. 


That is OK. Because, at this time, I can look at any cloud, mist, or fog, and I can see with my mind's eye the composition of that ghostly creation. How much is water, how much is air, and why it is light or dark. 


I can see the rain and visualize how each raindrop is produced. I can listen to the weather forecast and translate it into a language that makes sense to me. 


My next challenge is writing about it such that you can see those details as clearly as I can see them. 


None of this is easy.


Grappling with difficulty and doubt


I have one predominant reason why I am doing all this work. To explain disease in a way that makes sense.

I can see how cells come together; how proteins in the nucleus communicate to their brethren in the cytoplasm; why cancer cells transform from large cells to small cells; why cancer cells are chaotic, and so on. 


The problem with writing about it is that I have to explain basic concepts, such as how ions bring proteins together. And each time I try to explain a basic concept I have to delve even deeper to fully understand it myself. For example, to appreciate the difference between calcium binding to proteins and magnesium binding to proteins means that I had to understand the dynamics of acid/base connections.


It is a continuous struggle. I have had to delve into physics, math, as well as chemistry. And at the same time, I have ongoing doubt. Do I really have something of value? Perhaps I am imagining that my ideas are worthwhile.

In the face of uncertainty

Here's the thing: very few people may read what I am writing; even less may agree with me. But, I have waded too far into the current to go back. 


I will continue with the struggles, knowing that if even a small fraction of what I have in my brain can prove useful to others, it will have been worth it.

About the author 

Juman Hijab

Juman has been in clinical practice as a physician for more than three decades. Her lifelong interest has been in the chemistry of life.



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